August 30, 2014

Miracle in a Dry Season




After reading the prequel novella, Appalachian Serenade, I couldn’t wait to receive Miracle in a Dry Season. I certainly wasn’t let down. This book has the same feel, the same setting as the first story and I enjoyed it.

Being a book cover lover, I have to mention the cover art to this story. It is both beautiful and fitting. I love when a cover tells a bit about what’s inside. And with a front cover recommendation from Debbie Macomber, you know you’ll find a fabulous treat inside.

This story takes place in 1950s Appalachia. Perla Long, a young single mother, and her daughter, Sadie, comes to Wise, West Virginia to stay with Delilah and Robert, Perla’s aunt and uncle. We first meet them in Appalachian Serenade.) She has a special gift that others find strange and possibly even evil. If that wasn’t enough, she’s a single mother, and not by widowhood, so that makes her an even bigger target of the town’s gossip. The townsfolk’s whispers and feeling shunned by the community makes it difficult for Perla.

She has caught the eye of Casewell Phillips, a woodworker in town, and friend of Perla’s aunt and uncle, but the attraction is complicated and confusing. With even Pastor Longbourne’s admonition of the ‘evil doer’, it makes it difficult for Casewell to ignore the talk, and follow his heart.

The ground is parched, the clouds are dry, and the weary town feels defeated, but Perla’s gift helps sustain them. How then is it that they still want her gone? It’d take a miracle to win the townsfolk over.

Filled with truth, wrath, love, fear, judging, heartbreak, condemnation, and forgiveness, this book is filled to the brim with emotion. I love the goodness that lies beneath the surface of this town. I won’t soon forget this story, the characters (especially Sadie, Casewell, and Perla) or the sentiment it left in my heart. This is a lovely book with solid Christian principles.

Cover: Love it
Title: Love it
Publisher: Bethany House Publishers
Pages: 304
First Lines: Casewell’s stomach grumbled. He hoped no one in the surrounding pews could hear it. He’d thought to eat some warmed-over biscuits this morning, but the barn cat had slipped into the house and found the bread wrapped in a dish-cloth on the back of the stove. 


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a Review Copy Bethany House. I was not required to write a positive review. The options I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255